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--- News and reports ---

 

Nr.XII: South America II

01.09.2010 (Peru/Greenland) - 07.04.2011 (Argentina)

 

 

 

30.03.2011, Ushuaia (Argentina): With our experience as guides in the Arctic on small expedition vessels (Svalbard and Greenland), we are hired for two trips to the Antarctic. On the 7th of March we board the M/V Ushuaia (www.antarpply.com), and become part of the expedition staff team of 6 people. The famous Drake Passage shows its calmest side, so we can enjoy the fascinating bird life around us. Wandering albatrosses (the biggest flying bird of the world), black browed albatrosses, white chinned petrels, giant petrels and cape petrels come along and fly around the ship. As we arrive at the Antarctic Peninsula, we encounter the white continent. Steep mountains and glacier ice everywhere. Snowfall, wind and sunshine take turns in creating a variable weather for us. Humpback whales, minke whales, crabeater seals, southern fur seals, elephant seals and numerous gentoo- and chinstrap penguins are responsible for the program. We are out on deck forever to enjoy marvellous sunrises and –sets, while the ship is gliding through narrow channels on flat water. It is one of the most fascinating areas on earth! 

While we were - far away from anything and without access to news - in the Antarctic, many things happened in the world. We hear from the protests and starting wars in the Arabian world on our day in the harbour in Ushuaia. We are shocked and deeply feel for the people of Japan, whose country encounters so much trouble at the moment. We remember with how much devotion our Japanese friends Yoko and Hiro have raved about their country, when we were riding together with them on the Carretera Austral (see cyclists we met). With enthusiasm we booked a flight via New Zealand to Tokyo, from where we wanted to cycle to Southeast Asia. Now we have to change plans and chancel our flight to Japan. We plan to stay longer in New Zealand and replan our route through Asia...

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

 


18.02.2011, Ushuaia (Argentina): Patagonia means wind. It usually blows from the west or northwest. Wind is always present. And windy means really windy. If there are trees or hills, then the factor wind is less a problem or enjoyment – depending on which direction you are riding. The worst is the "Pampa" – the dry grassland that is mainly flat and without trees – cyclist’s nightmare, because you are completely exposed to "the enemy". First thing in the morning – while hearing the fly of the tent shaking in the wind – is checking out, if it is cross- head- or tailwind. We leave El Chalten towards east southeast and peddle into endless Patagonian Pampa. This should be a stretch of tailwind as everybody ensured us. But today – no wind. We skip El Calafate and go directly into some mean headwinds. Besides that it is raining and one day we stop just after 17 kilometres, because it is too cold riding into storm and rain. We camp beside the road next to a dead horse; could not find a better place. The next day is not much better and in the evening we try to escape from the wind by camping underneath the road in a channel for water and cows. We cover very short distances only – 17 km, 57 km, 38 km,... – but it is hard work and exhausting (especially for the head). We don’t make much progress; get pushed off and into the road by the wind. Our screaming and cursing – wind blows it away. Once again we cross the Chilenean border and reach the small town of Cerro Castillo. Camping is only possible on the playground – as there is a huge wooden fence, which gives protection against the storm. Eventually the road turns into the wind and we fly towards Puerto Natales and Punta Arenas. From now on we are a bit more careful and try to camp close to civilization and search for protection by houses and huts. Then it is only a two hour ride on the ferry across the Magellan strait and we reach "tierra del fuego". We call it "wind land", which is more appropriate. Again – flat and tree-free Pampa awaits us. It looks like a few thousand kilometers ago in the north of Argentina, but here it is colder, windier and it rains more. The road (another dirt road) leads straight towards the east – and we can expect tailwind. For one day it works and we are pushed by the wind. Then the unexpected is happening: the wind turns around 180 degrees and we fight against a big storm until we reach the Argentinean border. On the next day everything is back to normal and we finally get our tailwinds and ride (together with Mike - see cyclists we met) to Rio Grande. We are happy – but not for very long, because once again the Patagonian wind shows his teeth. In the morning, when we leave Rio Grande, the cross wind is so strong that we can hardly hold our bikes upright and push them. After 6 kilometres of walking our bicycles (riding is too dangerous) we finally get to a bend in the road. From there on we make 40km/h in the flat, 60 km/h downhill and 20 km/h uphill without pedalling! We feel sorry for the few cyclists that come from the south towards us (see cyclists we met). About 150 km before Ushuaia the Pampa finally comes to an end. All of a sudden there is forest, small rivers, mountains and glaciers to look at. The nights become freezing cold and in the morning there is frost everywhere. On Valeska’s birthday (15.02.) our bike computer shows 70.000 kilometres. Just 80 kilometres further and a day later we reach Ushuaia, the southernmost city in the world. We have reached the end of our South America leg. We covered 27,605 kilometres from Alaska to here, 12,777 kilometres just in South America. Our friend Monika hosts us for a while and we prepare for our next destinations... Antarctica and Asia.

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

  


 

29.01.2011, El Chanlten (Argentina): Villa O’Higgins is situated at the end of a one way road. The only way south is via a tourist ship across the Lago O’Higgins. It is quite expensive (88 Euros per person) – especially as we leave the tour already half way through. There are seven cyclists on the ship, four stay aboard and do the tourist stuff, just the French girl Coralie (see cyclists we met) and we get off at "Candelario Mansilla". There is one farm and a couple of hundred meters further up the track the chilenean border station, where we get our exit stamp. From here we take a steep, stony track across a pass. We can ride our bikes most of the time, but not in the steep bends. On the very top is the border to Argentina, the border line consists of a sign in the forest. The driveable track ends and we get to a single trail. Hard work lies ahead of us. Together with Coralie we push, tear, pull, heave and lift our bicycles across tree trunks, roots, through small rivers, swamps, on steep hills and into gorges. Despite that we have a lot of fun taking pictures and videos, laugh and are happy about dragging our bikes for 23 km through the forest. Crazy, hm? We take our time and enjoy this unique experience. On the next day, after passing the Argentinean boarder post (another station in the middle of nowhere) we get onto another small tour boat, which brings us across Lago del Desierto. After 40 km of dirt road we reach El Chalten, the climber’s and trekker’s capital of Argentina with just 350 inhabitants. We stay for a couple of days, relax and go for some hikes towards Cerro Torre (which hides in clouds) and Fitz Roy, which we can see in bright sunshine. Then it is time to go on towards Ushuaia, the southernmost city in the world...

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

 


 

26.01.2011, Villa O'Higgins (Chile): Rolling out of Esquel towards the chilenean border. Suddenly it is green. We are on the famous "Carretera Austral". This road is a dirt road with unusual steep up- and downhills. Every day we are doing lots of climbing, therefore cannot cover large distances (only approx. 60 km per day). The landscape is stunning. Behind every bend and every hill we get another great view. Fantastic mountains, glaciers, rivers and lakes, meadows and forests. We usually find nice places to camp besides rivers, lakes or waterfalls, or "just" with good views towards some mountains. In the beginning the weather is sunny and warm, then it changes to being rainy and cloudy, which actually quite often creates spectacular light. We meet an unbelievable big number of cyclists. Many just do a short trip, some go for longer distances and we go with a few together for a while. With Hannes, Yoko and Hiro we are a team of five until the town Coihaique. Later we cycle for a while with Prado and Guillaume, after that we get to know Pauline and Hugh. See cyclists we met. 310 km of dirt road, then suddenly 290 km of asphalt. Pavement takes away the remote and adventurous feeling. But on the last 500 kilometers to Villa O’Higgins dirt rules again. We kind of enjoy the slow progress and are on one of our longest stretches of dirt road (see superlatives). At Puerto Yungay a small ferry takes us across the fjord and we reach – after 18 days of cycling and just one day off – the village Villa O’Higgins. This is a weird place: at the end of the road, end of the world, in the middle of nowhere. There is a bunch of colourful houses, a few small shops, hardly any car in sight, but WiFi Internet everywhere available in the village...

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

 


 

03.01.2011, Esquel (Argentina): We say good bye to our friends in San Juan and start early in the morning with the ride to Mendoza. 180 kilometres of crosswinds, headwinds, luckily also tailwinds and we reach after a long day on the road the beautiful city. Everything is closed and there are almost no cars on the street. It is siesta time. We have our problems with the Argentinean opening-, working- and eating-hours. Often it is the case that we camp before villages and cities. In the morning (9 a.m.), when we are passing through a settlement, everything is still closed. We usually come to the next village in the afternoon. Everything is again closed – from noon to 5 p.m. is siesta and everybody is literally sleeping. But it is open until 9 p.m. in the evening. That does not help us much, because at that time we are already past the cities and are looking for a spot to camp, or we want to eat dinner somewhere – but the restaurant-kitchens do not open before 10 p.m. Dinnertime is between 10 and 12 p.m. Hard to get used to! After two relaxing days in Mendoza we hit the road again. We want to reach San Martin de los Andes (already in Patagonia) before Christmas. It is 1300 kilometres from Mendoza to San Martin and until the 23rd of December we have exactly 11 days. We have already heard that this stretch along the "Ruta 40" should be tough, but we did not think that every single day would be that demanding. With the target in our minds, we try to push as much as possible, but it is not an easy thing to ride more than 100 kilometres daily. We fight headwinds, that almost make us ride backwards und crosswinds, that push us off the road a couple of times. The track is awfully hilly and almost every day we are climbing more than 1000 metres of altitude. Then another stretch of dusty and slow dirt-road, about whose existence we did not know. Long distances without infrastructure and often we carry up to 30 litres of water on our bikes. Besides all that this stretch is landscape wise extremely beautiful! In the first days we are riding rolling hills on a mostly straight road. Later we are wheeling across hills, through valleys and are sweating in the uphills of small passes. The "Ruta 40" is leading us along high volcanoes and Andean peaks, where snow-patches are shimmering in the sun. It is a barren and dry landscape and the vegetation mainly exists of low and spiky bushes. The few people we meet are extremely friendly. Car and truck drivers stop and give us cold water and coke. Besides other places we camp at a private house, where we also get invited for dinner and at a police checkpoint where we sleep just beside the road. But normally we find fantastic spots to put up our tent in the "pampa" and sleep far away from any civilisation under the stars and the full-moon. Since we entered Argentina we often see small shrines with saints beside the road. Saint Severin, saint John, saint Mary,... all of them have their small shelters beside the road. Our most loved saint is "Difunta Correa", who takes care of all the travellers. She died on thirst in the desert. When she was found dead, her child was sucking on her breast and therefore survived. That’s why travellers put bottles of water to her shrines, so nobody needs to die of thirst. We stop at these places, make our water-bottle-sock-covers wet – our "African fridge", which is cooling the water in the bottles due to evaporation – and therefore we "always" have cold water (even on the hottest days). Thank you "Difunta Correa"! Eventually the rivers start carrying water and trees are often lining their shores. We are crossing an extreme climatic border on the 23rd of December. In the morning we are leaving from our camp-spot in an arid semi-desert, but in the evening we are under coniferous trees, where creeks carry crystal clear water and the temperature is moderate. We have reached San Martin de los Andes and are in Patagonia! We have a cosy Christmas in green San Martin, with rainy, grey and chilly weather. What a pleasure after so much barrenness, desert and heat! We are passing the beautiful area of the "seven lakes" on our further way south. Again we meet other cyclists, with some we ride together for a while (see cyclists we met) and also other self-drivers are crossing our path (see other vehicles). U-shaped valleys, lakes, steep rock-faces, high peaks, snow-patches, small glaciers, forests and grass. We almost can’t stop gazing at the beauty of the country. For the first time we encounter lots of (mainly Argentinean) tourists. The small villages on our way are a mixture of the European-alpine-edelweiss-style and new-worlds city-grids with wide roads. Accompanied by the first thunderstorm since weeks we reach Esquel. We take a break, enjoy some relaxing days with our friend Marcelo – who we got to know as a chef on our Arctic-voyages – and celebrate New Year in his lately opened restaurant "Entre Platos" :-)

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 


 

08.12.2010, San Juan (Argentina): We leave Salta in the early morning, together with Ivana & Harry and Alicia & Alvaro (see cyclists we met), and soon we are wheeling through a beautiful, dry canyon landscape. The road is snaking its way through the gorge. Colourful sedimentary rock, cacti, almost no villages, no traffic and way too high temperatures (above 40 degrees). Alicia & Alvaro are having a rest-day in the small town of Cafayate. The four of us remaining ride on southwards. Strong headwinds are bothering us. Especially in the afternoons the wind is so strong that we hardly get above 8 km/h. Dusty kilometres on unpaved roads. Fantastic camping in the semi-desert and cool nights. Nice landscapes and lonely streets. The Argentineans are extremely friendly people and we have many nice encounters: staying over night with the fire-fighters in Chilecito; camping in a family’s garden; get veggies and fruits for free; get a bottle of wine as a present in a shop; everybody is waving, says "hallo" and curiously is coming up to us when we stop in a village. What a difference to the countries we visited before! We meet other cyclists on our way (see cyclists we met) and part from Ivana & Harry for two days, since they meet up with friends and have to ride faster. All of a sudden – after lots of blue sky in the last days – thunderclouds are building up in the evening when we put up our tent in the thorny desert. A hailstorm is rolling over the country. We are untroubled from the worst, but anyhow get hit by a big portion of rain. After we have met Ivana & Harry again in the small village of San Augustin the wind suddenly changes – for just one day. We take the chance and manage to ride over 200 kilometres (see superlatives)! On the next day it is only a stone’s throw to San Juan, Ivana’s hometown, where we are invited at her mother’s and sister’s place and wait for Alicia & Alvaro who are close to us...

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 


 

25.11.2010, Salta (Argentinia): La Paz is disappearing behind us and we are wheeling south after the All Saints’ weekend. Like in all Middle- and Southamerican countries the holiday-drinking (until you drop) is big in Bolivia and one of the major spare time activities. The Bolivians are usually very reserved and inapproachable (we often have the problem to find someone in a shop who would like to sell something to us), but when they are filled up to the top we become target number one and the question, that they babble, is: "How much is your bike?" After three days we turn off the paved road at Huari. We search our way across small tracks and herds of lamas until we reach the small settlement of Quillacas. Passed the village we ride on a road "currently" under construction. The track is a summery of different stages of being not-finished and the surface differs between good to ride on and hard to push through. But it is a camper’s paradise! Volcano Tunupa is showing us the way and via a bumpy track we reach the Salar de Uyuni (with more than 10.000 km² the world’s largest salt lake) at the village Jirira and roll onto the salt. It is an unreal gliding across an endless white surface. It has something in common with snowmobiling on Spitzbergen (see www.philipp-schaudy.net). The wheels are turning easily and on our way to Isla Inca Huasi we hardly see a car. But at the island we reach tourist-hell: tens of tour-jeeps are parked at the restaurant. On our second day on the salt lake we ride east and at the salt hotel we exit the lake. Back on a bumpy track we finally reach Uyuni. Here we do not only find the best Pizza in all Bolivia, but also meet two other cycling-couples: Ivana & Harry and Alicia & Alvaro (see cyclists we met). We hit the next part of bad dirt road together. It is a beautiful ride – uphill, downhill, uphill, downhill with wonderful views – but the track is partly in very poor conditions. It is fun to ride with other people, we find great spots to camp and sit around the fire in the evenings and mornings. Night temperatures are freezing (-6 in the tent) and during the day it is hot and windy. We need four days to reach Tupiza, where the pavement starts again. Including the salt lake the leg from Huari to Tupiza is one of our longest stretches of continuous dirt-road (see superlatives). We part from the others, since we don’t want a rest day, and after a long day on the road we cross the border to Argentina. From the Altiplano (4000 meters) we ride across rolling hills and finally drop down through a long and (head)windy valley to Jujuy and Salta (1400 meters). Again we ride into other bike riders (see cyclists we met) and it is getting greener, warmer and humid. Typical for Argentina: narrow roads and lots of traffic – that’s the negative thing. But there are many positive ones: supermarkets, cheese, olives, wine and every other thing that we like or need - we suddenly can get. And in comparison to Bolivia: clean bed sheets, fettled toilets with seats, high prices, no garbage along the roads, locals on vacation,... Yes, life in Argentina is generally much easier for us! But also here "holiday drinking" is big. From behind a drunken motorcyclist is crashing into Philipp’s bike and one pannier is broken – luckily nothing more happened. We stop in Salta (thankfully the weekend is over) and enjoy a few days in the pretty town and meet Ivana, Harry, Alicia and Alvaro again...

 

   

 

 

  

 

 

  

  

  

 

  

 

  


01.11.2010, La Paz (Bolivia): Shortly after we have left Camaná the road turns left – no more headwinds, but uphill. After a thousand meters of altitude climbed, we are on a relatively flat highland, which is cut by deep trenches. We would never have dreamed about it, but the wind is howling from behind! A dry, wide country with sand dunes and naked mountains is surrounding us. Suddenly a strange character appears – we meet our first long-distance-walker (see other vehicles). We need two days to get from the coast to Arequipa (at 2353 meters). Shortly before the city we are bumping into another cyclist who just left Arequipa. It is Robert, a cyclist from northern Italy (Südtirol) and we exchange our experiences of the last days (see cyclists we met). We like Arequipa a lot. The historic centre is fantastic! It is almost clean and especially the visit to the monastery Santa Catalina is a highlight for us. What a beautiful complex. It formerly was a noble-monastery, where each nun had her own house and up to four servants. In the evenings we sit for our "sundowner" on the rooftop-terrace of our hostel and enjoy the view over the city to volcano El Misti. After we leave Arequipa, we are pedalling uphill again. We are riding through a lonely, hilly mountain landscape with Alpacas and Vicuñas (the feral Alpaca). On the second day we are heavily breathing when riding across the pass "Crucero Alto", which is the highest point we have reached by bicycle so far: 4528 meters (see superlatives). Every small hill needs lots of effort to be climbed in this altitude – it stays hilly. Two times we sleep above 4200 meters, and night-temperatures are falling well below zero, before we are wheeling down to lake Titicaca (on 3808 meters) and reach after a very long day (for this altitude) - 136 kilometres – Puno. This is the starting point for trips to the floating islands and the small town is crowded by tourists. We don’t need that folkloric-Disneyland and head on the next morning. Along the lake it seems to be poor, dirty, but people are waving from the fields when we pass and there is a pleasant vibe in the air. But there is scarily much activity on the small fields. People are ploughing and seeding, because the rainy season could start any day and on some afternoons the clouds are building up enormously. Luckily we have rain only once at night. During the days we stay dry and enjoy mostly sunny days. Again we meet cyclists – this time from France (see cyclists we met). The ride along the enormous lake towards Bolivia is getting more and more lonely and beautiful. Especially after we have passed the border at Kasani, we almost seem to be on our own private road, which is snaking through the hills and we enjoy fantastic views across the lake and to the Cordillera Real. We stop in Copacabana, a friendly and nicely located little town with lots of tourism. Since we have left the Peruvian coast we have slept at the typical dirty road-stops. At a police-roadblock we could put up our tent in a dusty room. We camped in the wild above 4000 meters at beautiful places and slept in dingy hotel rooms. On the last day on the bike before reaching La Paz a campervan is passing by and stops ahead. We get invited by the nice French couple for coffee and tea and chat in a mix of Spanish and English. Extremely nice – see other vehicles. Shortly after a Swiss cyclist is crossing our way – see cyclists we met. There is a steep drop from the relatively flat area into the gorge where La Paz is. We are speeding down five hundred meters of altitude on the "freeway" to reach the heart of the city and find some nice accommodation. Since some time we are in contact with the emigrated Weizer (an Austrian city in Styria) Paul, the owner of the restaurant "Vienna", and phone him straight away after we have scrubbed off the road-dirt from the last days. "Are you hungry? Then come on over!" Paul says in a broad Austrian dialect. Shortly after, we meet him at the "Vienna", where it looks like in a very nice Austrian restaurant. We eat delicious food, drink fine wine (which comes in extra bottles for the "Vienna") and enjoy the funny conversations and the evening with Paul! Also in the next days we visit the "Vienna", get to know Paul’s daughter Tanja and spend hours sitting in the restaurant every day ;-) Thank you very much for everything Paul, we will not forget you and little-Austria in La Paz!

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

  

  

  


18.10.2010, Camaná (Peru): We are wheeling out of Lima. It feels good to be back in the saddle, to suck the trucks odour deep into our lungs and the plastic-bags and Coke-bottles that are drifting by with the wind are making us think – who has emptied them? How long is this bag already on its way? Where will it go? Yes, we are back on the road. Soon we leave the dirt of Lima behind and push into the coastal fog, which is with us for the first days. Another companion is the wind, who is blowing towards us with constant power. Most of the time, the desert landscape is quite nice – sand-dunes, hills, almost not inhabited. Small villages and towns are on our way – Cerro Azul, Pisco, Ica, Palpa, and finally we reach Nasca. We check out the Nasca Lines from a viewing-tower (we skip flying) and make an excursion to the cemetery of Chauchilla. This is really worth a visit – the whole "ground" of the area is a mix of bones (sometimes with mummified meat) and sand. In between mummies can be viewed in their graves, whose skulls (with long dreadlocks) are staring at us - when we look at them. Here, and also on the stretch before, me meet other self-drivers – see other vehicles. The further way along the coast is pretty – sand, sea, mountains and every now and then a village. Although we had to fight headwinds, we made good progress until Nasca. Now things change and we are slow. The wind becomes storm-scale and the flat coast steep, with numerous uphills. This combination makes us almost not moving at all. Uphill we go with 4 km/h, in flat parts with 8 and downhill with 12. Our average kilometres per day are bottom down and as Camana, the small city where we would finally turn into the mountains, comes almost in "sight", Valeska gets severe stomach-problems with diarrhoea and fever. We make an emergency stop in La Planchera and have to sleep in one of the most disgusting hotels of South America (it reminds us a lot of our ride through Africa). But however – here in southern Peru we feel much safer than in the north. People seem to be friendlier and nicer, and the places more laid back and not so hectic. Even in the most forgotten village and in the most run down hostel, everything is relaxed. On the next day we are literally just riding across a hill. Besides Valeska’s diarrhoea there is also a car-race (from Arequipa to Lima) that stops us, and the Pan Am is closed for half of the day. But we reach the small village Ocoña, where we find definitely better accommodation than on the day before. Finally Valeska’s stomach is getting better and we reach Camana – and hopefully the end of the headwinds. Because, now we are leaving the coast and start riding up into the mountains...

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

  

 


06.10.2010, Lima (Peru): After the months we worked on Svalbard (Spitzbergen) and Greenland we stay for two days holiday on Iceland, before we fly back to Austria. We meet up with friends and family and prepare for the next lag of our adventure. "Northland Professional" stocks us up with lots of new equipment – tent, shoes, outdoor clothing, fleece-jackets, socks, underwear, headlamps and much more. "Radsport Kotnik" renews our bicycles completely and organises equipment from other companies (Bikers Best, Tubus , Garmin). Our "machines" get new suspension-forks, wheels, pedals, bottom brackets, sprockets, wires, carriers, gearshifts, saddles, panniers and much more – and we get a new GPS. Schwalbe again sponsors new tires – now we are testing the new Marathon that will be released in 2011, which weighs slightly less than the Marathon Plus Tour. Dazer sends us another ultrasonic dog-chaser – so we will still be safe from those biting bastards. Magura is becoming a new sponsor of us. Magura is not only equipping our bikes with fantastic breaks, but also supports our adventure with a financial donation. We want to thank all our partners for the good relationship and trust!! (see also our partners page).

We don’t calm down from our summer working-, organising- and visiting-stress-level in Austria, therefore stretch our stay for a week to get more relaxed and balanced. Then we head back to Lima, where our host-family Chantal, Marc and the kids are already awaiting us. We set up our bicycles, pack up our belongings and after a long break we are back on the road and on our way south... :-)

 

  

  


01.09.2010, Kaiser Franz Josef Fjord (Northeast Greenland): We are hopping with the plane from Lima to Austria, where we stopover to meet family and friends, before we fly up to Svalbard (Spitzbergen), the European Arctic. Like every year, we are working as guides on a small vessel (80 passengers), doing expedition-voyages around the archipelago (www.oceanwide-expeditions.com). Pack ice, polar bears, walruses, seabirds, tundra, polar desert and great hikes are awaiting us. Working is (as any job in tourism) in some way exhausting, but on the other hand lots of fun. Every year is a new challenge and different from the past ones. Time flies and after six trips around Spitzbergen, we sail to Northeast Greenland. Marvellous weather accompanies our last voyage and even the infamous Denmark Strait (for heavy storms well known) is calm as we have never experienced it before – a great ending for a long season... 

  

 

  

  

 

  

 

  

  


   

   

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